Backpacking Denali – 7 Mistakes NOT to Make

We went on to Alaska for our honeymoon. Sort of. I mean, we call it our honeymoon because it was the first trip we took together after we got married (even though it was like 5 months after the day).

We couchsurfed and camped our way from Juneau to Denali National Park and saw some of the most beautiful sceneries we’d ever seen.

Of all of the wonderful memories that came out of our trip to Alaska, a week backpacking in Denali was the most notable. Not only for the raw and the wild of Alaska that it represents, but also for the high rate of mishaps and misadventures that happened there:

1. We went in spring. Spring might not be the best time to go backpacking in Denali

There’s nothing wrong about going in spring. But it’s a little bit of a crapshoot. You can have nice weather, blue sky on one day and snow shower on the next.

Denali mountain range
View of Denali mountain range, Day 1
View of Denali mountain range, Day 3

Another reason not to in spring is the chance that the area beyond Eielson overlook is still closed due to snow. That was what happened to us, but it was not a big deal since what was available to explore was still mind-numbingly big.

One benefit of going in spring: we didn’t see a single soul out there once we got off the main road.

2. We lost perspective: Things always look smaller in the distance

Bushwhacking through Denali National Park
Where’s the harmless wee brushes we saw earlier?

Those overhead thickets we were fighting through looked like harmless, calf-length brushes nestled under gently sloping hills about 30 minutes ago.

Ah, the lesson of perspective.

Something about the landscape really distorts the sense of perspective out there. We were foiled over and over again and ended up scratched and bruised from bush whacking.

And the gently sloping hills?

Up close they turned into scree-covered, ankle twisting, very steep hills.

Deadly hills.

3. We were too lazy to climb up: Following a drainage is not the best idea

Faced with a hollow (small valley) with a river running along it, it was very tempting to stay close to the river. Why hike uphill if you don’t have to, plus you can forget about continuously stopping to consult the map for awhile.

As long as you follow the river you won’t get lost.

So, you walk towards it deeper and deeper into the valley, until you hear ‘Squeealch’ as your boot sinks in ankle deep water.

Freezing water.

And you try to remember if you pack that extra pair of socks after all.

Ugh.

4. We didn’t allocate enough days. We thought 4 days would be enough

Beautiful Alaska, Denali National Park
Beautiful Alaska, Denali National Park. See the spots on the lower left of the image? Those are grizzly bears

We could’ve stayed there forever.

Denali National Park is huge. At 6 million acres it’s bigger than the state of Massachusetts. We were only planning to stay there for 4 days — but in the end we ended staying for a week. And even then it wasn’t enough.

If you’re not planning to do a hike, 2 days would be enough. If you’re a little into hiking, I’d suggest a week.

If you’re big into hiking like we are — a month or two.

Or a lifetime.

5. We depended on SteriPen for purifying our water

Classic SteriPEN with Pre-filter
SteriPen -- good for everything else

Because it was so cold our battery powered SteriPen stopped working. Lesson learned: batteries are unreliable in cold weather.

Actually, the bigger lesson was: always have backup plan to purify your water. Especially if you’re out in the middle of nowhere.

We could boil water though, which led me to the next point:

6. We brought the wrong stove: Propane or cartridge stoves do not work well in cold weather

Those who took physics will remember that… well, I don’t remember how the theory goes, but it goes something like : cold weather equals having all of your shit stop working.

Great.

No hot food. No drinking water. What a honeymoon.

7. Overestimating our knowledge of map, compass, and reading the topo lines

There are no trails in Denali. You have to know how to read a map and a compass.

We were pretty new to map reading and even though we weren’t lost, we kept second guessing ourselves.

That’s especially true when we were bushwhacking ankle deep in boggy marshes. We kept consulting the map — there must be a way out of this miserable wetness.

Yes, there was. Up!

Let’s consult the topo map. Oh, it doesn’t look that bad.

So climb and climb we did until it was getting really steep we were in danger of slipping and not being able to stop ourselves..

We consulted our map only to find out there are two separate river forks about an inch apart on the map. Which one were we following?

Crap.

Maybe we were lost after all.


I originally titled this post ‘4 Mistakes We Made in Denali’ — apparently we ended up making more than that.

You’d think we had a horrible time there with the wet, the weather, and our gear failure. At certain times we did our share of cursing and whining.

But Denali was… majestic

Covered in cloud most of the time, we finally got to see the majestic Denali

Mountains, wildlife, and even more mountains. It was our kind of honeymoon. Wet boots, broken equipment, and all.

And we got to see grizzlies! In the wild! A whole bunch of them, actually.

But that’s for the next post.

What are your most memorable ‘mistakes’ ?

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47 Replies to “Backpacking Denali – 7 Mistakes NOT to Make”

  1. “What a honeymoon”… Haha~ Very funny report. Thanks for sharing 🙂 Attempting a solo Denali Backpack in August!

  2. I give you mad props for being hardcore camping people. I think I would have thrown in the towel quickly – not to mention I hate the cold.

  3. Wow. Wow. Wow. and more wow! Ok, so you did make mistakes, but you've learnt from them and besides who really cares when you get to see Grizzlies and that amazing scenery!! Love it! 🙂 Can't wait for the next post about the bears!

  4. Hiking in Denali must be a great experience, not so sure I would be comfortable with the idea of having grizzly bears there. Made the mistake as well quite often to think something doesnt look that bad when you are far away, but the closer you get the worse the climb usually is 🙂

    1. Ah, the grizzlies wouldn't bother you much with proper precaution. When we were there they didn't have the human=food association (I don't know about now). We actually came face to face with a grizzly when out backpacking in Denali and after freaking out big time were somewhat disappointed (and relief) with the fact the he/she didn't pay us the slightest attention.

      We have grizzlies that are used to human presence here in the Sierras and they are much, much worse.

  5. The Steripen? Well, we're taking one with us to South America. If it doesn't work, you'll hear about it on our site for sure 🙂

  6. We went in May. We took the state ferry from Birmingham to Juneau and camped on the deck to save money. Not really the fastest way to get there, but it was a very fun experience. We saw many gigantic cruisheships at the harbour. Those things are massive!!

  7. Can't agree more, Mark. We can't talk about Alaska without having that glazed and faraway look in our eyes. Amazing experience, indeed.

  8. I visited Denali about 12 years ago but went in July. Amazing, except for catching the flu and having to ride the hiker bus out while just wanting die…. I love Alaska and can't wait to return (no flu)!

    1. Oh no!!! Jack got sick too while we were camping. What he would not do for a cup of hot soup at the time — but of course like we mentioned, we couldn't even get our stove to work. So granola bars for him. Other than that, it was an amazing experience.

  9. Angie and I really want to do Norway for our honeymoon, but I'm still looking for a job so it is questionable right now. We don't want to sacrifice our upcoming RTW to do a nice honeymoon, so we are thinking Alaska might be a suitable alternative.

    Although we are thinking a 1 week cruise and then the train ride through Denali.

    What you did sounds freaking amazing. I don't remember seeing what time of year you went though. You said spring, but can you elaborate on the month? We're looking at going in May.

  10. What beautiful photos! I've never been the uber "lets go out in nature" person. I don't camp, or go on crazy hikes or anything like that, but those pictures of gorgeous. Minus the bears, I think this seems like something I could enjoy!

  11. Beautiful photos of Denali and loved hearing about your misadventures. You were very brave to go in the Spring, I'm more of a wimp. Also love the idea of hiking with no trails. Can't wait to see the post on the grizzlies!

  12. I'm sure it was a wonderful experience after all, since you can laugh about the mistakes you've made. In the end, it will be a great story to tell your grandchildren one day.

  13. Sounds like quite an adventure. You guys are brave. Did you encounter any bears head-on? I have a healthy fear of grizzly bears which I'm afraid would prevent me from backpacking in Alaska, though I really want to (it's so beautiful).

  14. Love these pictures! Interesting info about the water purifier…us non-hikers find it pretty cool that they even MAKE such a thing! I'm so glad you can post pics with you guys in them now:)

  15. Saw Denali from the plane and it looked awesome from there.
    Making mistakes us how you learn. Map reading in particular takes tons of practice. Attitude counts for a lot too and it sounds like you had the glass half full outlook. A nice post to read from the comfort of my warm house.

    1. Map reading is tricky!! But yes, during tough times we keep telling each other, 'This will make for a good story' and it helps to keep things in perspective.

  16. As you know, mistakes sometimes make the trip! Which it sounds like was the case here. Denali looks amazing and I'm sure it is even better in person! Unfortunately, it is still on my list but I'll make it up there some day.

    Thanks for sharing your story!

  17. Those mistakes will be taken in consideration for you next trip so lesson learned. This will simply make the next trip that much more organized. Thanks for the post since I see its not just me that tend to overlook important details.

    1. Oh yeah, we definitely have learned from our mistakes. Especially the part about equipment failure on cold weather? Lesson learned the heard way.

    1. Streripen is great! Especially their latest version… we sold the one we used on this Denali trip but we're going to get their newer version for our rtw trip.

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